Posts Tagged ‘Savasana’

London: April 7 – 8, 2018

June 9, 2018

Workshop at Oakside Yoga Studios, London.

Adho Mukha Virasana: rest the sides of your torso on the inner thighs. If you are stiff, take the thighs wider.

Push the floor away with the hands. Press up through the inner edges of the soles of the feet, especially at the base of the big toe. Roll the outer edges of the feet down.

Move the head of the shoulder blades forward (away from the wall), and the bottom of the shouder blades back to the wall.

Savasana with your bolster accross the thighs quiets and softens the pelvic area.

Photos by Dave Dayes.

© 2018 Bobby Clennell.

Advertisements

Starting Small — Kids and Yoga

March 16, 2016

Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in. I try my best to correctly credit all the photos, but if I’ve forgotten your child’s name, please send it to me, and I’ll update the post.

Push, push, push up into Chaturanga Dandasana.

Push, push, push up into Chaturanga Dandasana. It’s good to start young.

Trying to touch the sky with her toes.

This little girl is trying to touch the sky with her toes. Her grandmother, Iyengar teacher, Vickie Elwell says, “my girl joined me in my yoga practice today.”

Even the dolls love to do headstand.

Daniela De Nicola took this photo: Even toys love to do headstand.

Push up like a wheel!

Here is Michelle from Jakarta pushing up like a wheel…

caption

…and practicing Full Arm Balance with legs wide. What fun!

reading Watch Me Do Yoga

While her little sister reads Watch Me Do Yoga and thinks about which pose she should practice next.

 

Studying Childs Pose.

Child’s Pose looks interesting…

The end of the book.

… but maybe I’ll practice Savasana, just like Teddy.

© 2016 Bobby Clennell.

More kids

February 9, 2016

Kids approach yoga with great enthusiasm; it’s more like play than practice!

caption

Tadasana, Mountain Pose. Stand at attention! Cecillia Danson sent pictures of her nieces Daisy Blair, age 7, and her little sister Doris Blair, 5 years old. They were playing in Cecillia’s yoga room in Umeå, Sweden.

caption

Vrksasana. The trees are waving at you. Can you wave back?

caption

Adho Mukha Svanasana, Urdhva Mukha Svanasana. Down and up, and up and down!

caption

Chatturanga Dandasana — push, push, push!

caption

It’s more fun when we do it together! Aileen Kingerlee, from Kerry, Ireland, ran a week long yoga camps for kids during the summer at the Muckross Traditional Farms in Muckross National Park. They started each day with a yoga class, then spent the day out in nature, bread baking, butter making, milking cows, etc. Later, they did quieter poses, finishing with Sarvangasana. They each had their own yoga journal in which they wrote and drew about their day and their favorite poses.

caption

Adho Mukha Vrksasana, Upside-down Tree Pose Facing the Wall. Climb your feet up the wall.

caption

Kick up into this safety version of Adho Mukha Vrksasana, Upside-down Tree Pose.

caption

Upside-down Tree Pose with the feet together.

caption

… and spread the legs wide!

caption

Setu Banda on the Ropes. The world looks funny when you’re upside-down!

caption

Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana on a chair. This is what chairs were made for!

caption

Dhanurasana, Bow Pose. Anaya, 9 years old, and her sister Isya, 4 years old, love yoga.  It’s fun to rock back and forth…

caption

….. to push up from the floor: Urdhva Dhanurasana, Upside-down Bow Pose….

Fern in Urdhva Dhanurasana with arms up. Photo by Suzy Dodd.

… and to feel your hair tickle your toes. Fern in Kapotasana with arms up. Photo by Suzy Dodd.

caption

Bekhasana. Balancing is fun, too. This boy is strong!

caption

Savasana. And now it’s time to relax.

Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in. I try my best to correctly credit all the photos, but if I’ve forgotten your child’s name, please send it to me, and I’ll update the post.

© 2016 Bobby Clennell.

new kids love yoga blog

December 19, 2015

Kids getting inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga.

We're excited!

Amber and Webber from Taipei, Taiwan. We’re excited!

Let's get started.

Let’s get started.

caption

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog Pose).

Roar like a lion.

Roar like a lion!! Simhasana (Lion Pose).

Let's be turtles…

Let’s be tortioses…

…and pull our heads into our shells.

…and pull our heads into our shells -Kurmasana.

caption

Cool down in Adho Mukha Virasana (Child’s Pose).

Time to relax…

Savasana: Time to relax…

…like Teddy!

…like Teddy!

 

And here’s the advanced class using The Woman’s Yoga Book as a reference.

“Ivan decided he had practiced yoga for kids quite enough and turned his curious mind to Bobby Clennell’s brilliant The Woman’s Yoga Book”, says his Mother Julia Zabrodina from St. Petersburg, Russia.

caption

Parsva Swastikasana…

caption

….with Head On A Chair.

Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in. I try my best to correctly credit all the photos, but if I’ve fogotten your child’s name, please send it to me, and I’ll update the post.

Kids Love Savasana

November 1, 2014

Savasana (Relaxation Pose) is not just about lying around

We will begin with a few restorative poses. These setups were all done by the kids themselves.

This is 4½-year-old came with her mother to a morning class at the Iyengar Yoga Center Neve Tzedek in Tel Aviv taught by Gabi Doren. “She was amazing! I asked her to be my assistant and she took it very seriously. She demonstrated all the poses.” Here she is in Supta Baddha Konasana.

Next up, Chair Sarvangasana (shoulder stand). Make sure your hips are secure on the chair seat. Notice how this young student holds the chair legs to stop her sliding off the chair.

Donna Pointer's grand daughter. Chair Sarvangasana.

Donna Pointer’s granddaughter.

Savasana on stilts.

Bhishmasana, it’s  sort of like savasana on stilts.

Is everybody ready for Savasana? Place yourself very carefully in the center of your mat. Let your arms become limp and floppy, like perfectly cooked spaghetti.

caption

Here is Eleana, daughter of Michelle la Rue and Matt Dreyfus, who both teach at the Iyengar Yoga Institute of Greater New York. Photo by Bobby Clennell. She set herself up with the legs elevated, and a bolster just touching her head.

Completely relax your legs.  Covering the eyes can help you become still and quiet.

caption

Sue Fazoli’s daughter loves going to Mom’s classes, at the yoga studio in Chile.

photo 3

This little girl at a restorative class at Natural Yoga, Bogotá, Colombia, was not quite in the center of her mat.

Close your eyes and let the head feel soft.

Restorative class, last one of the year, at 4PM! — Iyengar YogaSchool Amsterdam

This little boy interpreted, very much in his own way, how to use a mat for Savasana. The class took place in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

……shhhh.

Galia Yogawalla took this photo last July on her yearly visit to RIMYI of her twins Amitai & Leela, 8 months at the time.

Galia Yogawalla took this photo last July on her yearly visit to Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute (RIMYI), Pune. Here are her twins Amitai & Leela, 8 months at the time, in the asana hall.

See if you can find Savasana in my picture book Watch Me Do Yoga.

Watch-Me-Do-Cover

© 2014 Bobby Clennell

February 2014, Pune.

March 10, 2014

The Institute.

At the RIMYI we have three classes with Geeta Iyengar per week: two women’s classes (one of which if there is room, the men may attend) and a pranayama class. Prashant Iyengar teaches at 7am, four mornings a week. If you want to experience B.K.S. Iyengar in action you had better get yourself along to the medical classes in the afternoons. In addition, there are six open practice sessions per week where Guruji practices along with local and visiting students, most of them teachers. He invariably interrupts his own practice to instruct someone else and oftentimes this someone is his grand daughter, Abhijata. We gather round to watch, listen and absorb. Then when Guruji returns to his own practice, we drift back to our mats and our own practice.

Prashant Iyengar.

“Rivers of breath” pranayama class.
Just as rivers nourish the land, Prashant says, the breath also provides us with nourishment. These days people flock to the cities to live, but there was a time when people settled along rivers. He talked about how the Amazon flows fresh into the ocean for miles and miles, providing sustenance for all who live along its banks. Similarly, when we practice pranayama, we become energized, re-vitalized, invigorated.

Geeta Iyengar. Wednesday February 19: excerpts from Geeta’s second back bend class.

Adho Mukha Virasana
Adho Mukha Svanasana
Sirsasana:

  • Be independent. If you lean against the wall, you will never learn.
  • For those who practiced rope Sirsasana; it’s a horizontal pose as well as a vertical pose. Even in Rope Sirsasana, place your palms on the floor the width of the shoulders to create that space. Don’t just hang – lift your shoulders up away from the floor and widen the collar bones.
  • Always move the front of the leg toward the back of the leg.
  • Forehead quiet, but the body should be very much active. Raise the whole body up from the inside.

(Many, many) Urdhva Dhanurasana’s into Viparita Dandasana: Men usually sit at the back, but today Geeta asked them to move to the front of the class. Geeta talked about some of the differences between men and women. Women are more supple then men. In these back bends, they can easily open the front ribs and lift the chest, but they tend to drop the buttocks and pelvis, which strains the lumbar. In addition, they tend to get tired. Men are strong, so they can hold themselves up more easily; but they push hard into the chest and don’t get the natural lift that women get. Some of us, myself included, had a wall to hold the elbows against and a workable mat (from the donated mats in the prop room), which held my feet well, enabling me to access my back muscles and raise my spine.

8-5“Lie on your back, with your head toward the platform.  With feet apart, walk your feet in and hold ankles. Bend your arms. Place your hands on the floor, close to your shoulders. Distribute the weight evenly between the palms. Broaden the palms. Push up into Urdhva Dhanurasana. Walk in with your palms. Raise the chest to walk the palms toward the feet.”

  • Open the armpit chest. Walk in with the feet and be on the arm side. Lift the side trunk!
  • Raise the heels and tailbone up; walk the feet in.

MEN

  • Men always take the knees out – roll them!
  • Shinbones are short, they should be long – knee to shin, elongation.
  • Navel should be up.
  • Suck the elbows straight – die at the elbows! Tighten the elbows! We strapped the elbows – yes, it really has to break into pieces! Have the belt close to the elbow joint.
  • The lightness has to come – lock in the elbow joint. All the men have a belt on the elbow.
  • The flexibility can be seen in Guruji’s photo from Light On Yoga, but the stability is not seen.
  • Pump the body close to the platform.

Viparita Dandasana

  • Push the back ribs forward. At first, keep your head up. Open chest with the head up. Then place head to floor, but keep the chest tall.
  • Men: in back bends, you don’t open your chest.
  • Women; your buttocks drop.

Savasana – stretch your legs out.
Adho Mukha Svanasana, hands to wall.
Sarvangasana
Either Halasana or Karnapidasana (depending on space available)
Pachimottanasana
Savasana

Acknowledgments:
Thank you Julia Pederson who observed the class and took notes, and
Richard Jonas who contributed to these notes from his memory of the class.

Guruji, Wednesday February 20: morning practice.

Guruji spoke of citta chidra or ‘perforated mind’ meaning fissured consciousness. Abhijata, his granddaughter called it ‘leaky consciousness’ as in  “Something slips out; the awareness does not hold itself inside.”

For we students, says Guruji, the mind goes to pleasure; “I like this, I don’t enjoy that, I enjoy this!” In that state, we work from the brain, of which the mind is but a part. When you work from the brain, you sweat in the face, you remain locked in the head, your consciousness does not penetrate the body.

Guruji explains we have to ‘expand from the center to open the four lobes of the brain.’

Guruji showed us the sole of his foot. He expands the arch so that the skin across it is sharp, not dull and not sinking. When one works like that, one does not sweat, one is not stuck in the brain; awareness permeates the areas of the body to which it is directed.
Verse II. 47: ananta samapattibhyam. The balanced state of awareness (samapatti) is endless (ananta).

For us, sadly, it is antara (different, other, outside) samapattibhyam.

The mind goes out, looking for pleasure. It is ‘antara’, different, other. Then, of course, it fluctuates and moves around.

We have to learn ananta (endless) samapattih, a balanced state of consciousness.

Yoga is a spiritual practice. Ananta – or endlessness – is a spiritual state.

When instead, you practice Antara – other, different – you are jumping from one thing to the next. “I like it, I don’t like it. Where is the discipline? There is none.”

One has to go beyond that kind if mind, beyond, ‘leaky consciousness.’

Ananata – endlessness – comes from discipline.

Read about chitta cidra on page 57 of The Core of the Yoga Sutras, B.K.S Iyengar’s most recent book. Those who want to look will see what he says on that page in the light of his little talk during the open practice at RIMYI that morning.

Acknowledgments:
Thank you Zoe Stewart who relayed Guruji’s discourse from the morning open practice.
Many thanks also to Richard Jonas for his sensitive editing.

Kids love props

October 16, 2013

Kids sometimes have their own unique and interesting ways of working with props. Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in.

DSCN2562

From Ann Van Regan in Ottawa does yoga with her 5-year-old grand-daughter, Darrah Boudreau: “Using a strap in Paschimottanasana. Elbows high.”

DSCN2559

“Janu Sirsasana… needs to flex her foot. She’s enjoying learning to open her chest.”

DSCN2564

Older sister Padmé Boudreau “after seeing a pic of one of Sri Iyengar.”

566230_405908292842073_420741238_n

22-month-old Adrian Wells from Ottawa doesn’t need to run to get blocks when he practices Uttanasana — he uses the floor. Photo by his mother, Christine Benedict.

DSCN2483

Ann Van Regan’s grand-daughter has an interesting way of working with blocks. She “likes to bring out every prop when she comes to visit. She makes long paths that meander from my yoga space int the kitchen. Little yogini’s get hungry. This is her version of Savasana… a bit hard on the neck, but comfy on the foam blocks.”

1150904_10151554399746314_2127536070_n

We use props to help us achieve the pose. Or the couch.

Who's propping who?

“Mama, can I help you?” Valerie Chai is helped by her 6-year-old son, Min. Valerie teaches at Maha Yoga, Kuching (near Kampong Tabuan), Malaysia.

photo copy 8

And sometimes the only prop you need is a helping hand from a friend.