Posts Tagged ‘Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute’

Kids Love Savasana

November 1, 2014

Savasana (Relaxation Pose) is not just about lying around

We will begin with a few restorative poses. These setups were all done by the kids themselves.

This is 4½-year-old came with her mother to a morning class at the Iyengar Yoga Center Neve Tzedek in Tel Aviv taught by Gabi Doren. “She was amazing! I asked her to be my assistant and she took it very seriously. She demonstrated all the poses.” Here she is in Supta Baddha Konasana.

Next up, Chair Sarvangasana (shoulder stand). Make sure your hips are secure on the chair seat. Notice how this young student holds the chair legs to stop her sliding off the chair.

Donna Pointer's grand daughter. Chair Sarvangasana.

Donna Pointer’s granddaughter.

Savasana on stilts.

Bhishmasana, it’s  sort of like savasana on stilts.

Is everybody ready for Savasana? Place yourself very carefully in the center of your mat. Let your arms become limp and floppy, like perfectly cooked spaghetti.

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Here is Eleana, daughter of Michelle la Rue and Matt Dreyfus, who both teach at the Iyengar Yoga Institute of Greater New York. Photo by Bobby Clennell. She set herself up with the legs elevated, and a bolster just touching her head.

Completely relax your legs.  Covering the eyes can help you become still and quiet.

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Sue Fazoli’s daughter loves going to Mom’s classes, at the yoga studio in Chile.

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This little girl at a restorative class at Natural Yoga, Bogotá, Colombia, was not quite in the center of her mat.

Close your eyes and let the head feel soft.

Restorative class, last one of the year, at 4PM! — Iyengar YogaSchool Amsterdam

This little boy interpreted, very much in his own way, how to use a mat for Savasana. The class took place in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

……shhhh.

Galia Yogawalla took this photo last July on her yearly visit to RIMYI of her twins Amitai & Leela, 8 months at the time.

Galia Yogawalla took this photo last July on her yearly visit to Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute (RIMYI), Pune. Here are her twins Amitai & Leela, 8 months at the time, in the asana hall.

See if you can find Savasana in my picture book Watch Me Do Yoga.

Watch-Me-Do-Cover

© 2014 Bobby Clennell

Bhishma

August 8, 2013

Many stories are told in the Mahabharata of Bhishma, the son of a great king and also a yogi, a learned man and a great warrior. This particular story tells how Bhishma, unparalleled in the noble the art of archery was himself shot through by arrows as he fought in battle. As he fell, his whole body was held above ground by the shafts of these arrows, which protruded from his back and through his arms and legs. Bhishma was suspended this way for 40 days.

B.K.S. Iyengar tells us that Bhishma was kept alive for so long most likely because of the strategic positioning — similar to acupuncture points; behind the heart, at the coccyx — of the arrows.

Bishma meditated as he transitioned in a timely and dignified manner from the manifest world to the un-manifest, eternal world. Seeing Bhishma laid out on such a bed of arrows humbled even the gods who watched from the heavens in reverence, silently blessing the mighty warrior.

I taught Bhishmasana as part of a restorative workshop at the Maha Padma Temple, Union Square, New York. Restorative yoga teaches us to be in the asana longer and penetrate deeper. It allows us to be to become familiar with a deeper level of internal practice and it prepares us for pranayama.

Bishma surrendered to his fate, which although already ordained by Krishna, was not violent. Stretched out on our yogis’ “bed of nails” and suspended in time, we surrendered to the moment, completely supported and utterly at peace.

Practice this pose and see how it makes you feel. The student, whose feet were placed apart on separate blocks and belted to stop them flopping out, said  she felt as if she were floating. After this picture was taken I lowered the blocks under her arms which helped create more space in her chest.

It’s a wonderfully cooling pose in the hot weather!

A modified version of this pose is often given in the medical classes at the Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute (RIMYI), Pune, India, to help those with heart problems.

Bhishmacharya

Photo by my host at Maha Padma Temple, Veronica Alicia Perretti

Fall Travels 2012

October 17, 2012

Yoga At Zea — Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

This was my second visit to www.yogaatzea.com.my which is situated on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur, or “KL” as it is commonly known.

Steamy, tropical, and surrounded by vast palm tree plantations, KL is a multicultural community, the majority of the people being Chinese, closely followed by the Muslim and Indian populations. Similar to Singapore, these three cultures live, work and observe their own religions and traditions, happily and peacefully, alongside of each other.

KL is a lively, bustling, and happy  place. I shopped for a Hello Kitty iPhone case and was taught by my hosts and their families to eat local delicacies at the Petaling Street night-market. It is also an affluent and  firmly established modern city.

Hello Kitty!

Dhanurasana

Ustrasana

Supta Padangustasana II

Setubandasana

The children’s class:

Being joyful!

Cat pose

Resources on teaching yoga to children:

  • Yogashastra Tome 1 by teachers of Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute and Light on Yoga Research Trust
  • Yogashastra Tome 2 by teachers of Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute and Light on Yoga Research Trust

Goodbye to Yoga at Zea — Zoe Kok, Anita Frisk, Bobby Clennell and Edison Tan Choon Tian

Next stop — Shelly Yoga, Taipei

In Taipei I was mesmerized by the swarming motorbikes in the city, but then calmed when I took a break in New Beitou a little town in the mountains, which was complete with hiking trails, hot springs and a Starbucks.

Inside “101”, the world’s second tallest building, a mall offers acres of high-end shopping: Burberry, Prada and Gucci, to name but a few, were all buzzing with activity. But the night markets are where Taipei comes alive. As the sun goes down, the streets come alive as thousands of people descend on the markets and alleyways for some of the best food and cheapest thrills that can be found in Asia. The same, quick stepping, fashionably dressed young people who flood these markets, are also taking to yoga in a big way.

My host Shelly teaches Iyengar Yoga at her studio Shelly Yoga, which is situated in the heart of Taipei. The students here were excitedly preparing for their first trip to study at the Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute (RIMYI), Pune.

The Priciples of Alignment

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana

Prepping for Pincha Myorasana

Parigasana (variation)

Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana with Crossed Bolsters

Kapotasana with a chair

Last stop — The Iyengar Yoga Institute of China

The city of Guangzhou has a population of 6.7 million and has a history of more than 2,800 years. It ranks first in China in the number of restaurants and tea–houses, and is famous for it’s food including a wide range of delicate pastries. I still miss the food, especially the delicious moon cakes, which are eaten at the beginning of the fall season (and which the students showered me with to bring back to New York).

Lion dance

The elegant and spacious Iyengar Yoga Institute of China has been built and equiped since B.K.S. Iyengar visited China with the Yoga Summit, just three months previous. The main studio has 25 sets of wall ropes (enough for 25 students) and the two other good-sized yoga studios are also similarly well equipped with ropes. This Institute also has a large office, a large reception area, and a hard working staff. The moment that you step into this place, you feel the dedication to and the respect for the Iyengar method.

Uttitha Padangustasana

Sirsasana on the ropes

Urdha Dhanurasana with a rope and blocks

Urdha Dhanurasana at the trestler

Parsva Hasta Padasana at the trestler

Uttanasana to the side

China was so much fun! The energy of the place is palpable and there is a feeling that anything can be achieved. A public lecture, where I spoke and demonstrated on why women should practice ‘women’s yoga’ was organized quickly and efficiently and was complete with background music, cameras, lights, raffles, an Iyengar yoga backdrop, a podium and a rapt audience of around 300.

Adho Mukha Svanasana with head on block

Urdhva Hastasana (head up)

Padangustasana (head down)

Uttitha Padangustasana II

Kapotasana with chair

Badha Konasana

Chatoosh Padasana — the Principles of Alignment

These are early days for Iyengar Yoga in China, and my hosts at the Institute — Chen Zhiyong and Niki Su are keen to show the Chinese yoga community at large something of this method. I agreed to model for a set of photos showing some of the uses of props. Here is a small selection from that photo shoot:

Pincha Myorasana

Ardha Chandrasana

Pincha Myorasana with the Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana bench

Badha Konasana in Rope Sirsasana

© 2012 Bobby Clennell.

Yoga Rahasya

April 16, 2011

Yoga Rahasya is a quarterly publication of the Ramamani Iyengar Memorial Yoga Institute (RIMYI), Pune and the Light on Yoga Research Trust, Mumbai, India. It was a great honor to be asked to design the (four) covers for this year.

Here are the first two. The first corresponded with Annual day — sometimes known as Institute day – and the second with Hanuman Jayanti. The third will come out later this year on Guru Purnima, and the forth on Patanjali Jayanti.

“Yoga Rahasya” refers to the wisdom of yoga, or ‘the secret knowledge of yoga’. The aim of Yoga Rahasya is to share the essence of Yogacharya B.K.S. Iyengar’s teachings. It contains original articles and transcripts of talks by B.K.S.Iyengar, as well as Geeta and Prashant Iyengar on philosophy, psychology, science and the art of yoga and life. This journal also includes articles by his students, practical details on the practice of asanas and information on treating chronic ailments through yoga.

WHO MAKES IT: Yoga Rahasya is produced exclusively by volunteers. Rajvi Mehta, a student of B.K.S. Iyengar since 1979 has been editing it since its inception in 1994.

WHO CAN SUBSCRIBE:  Yoga Rahasya is a scholarly tool for serious students rather than just a general interest magazine. It is open to all irrespective of whether they are teachers or students of Iyengar Yoga.

 

HOW TO GET IT: The most complete info on how to obtain it is on bksiyengar.com. From the menu bar at the top of the page, select ‘References’ then ‘Yoga Rahasya’. On the lower right corner there is a link for ‘subscription form’ Once completed, the site then directs the subscriber to print the form and send it along with the subscription fee (twenty five U.S dollars/four issues per year) to the relevant organization in their home country. Part of the annual dues that teachers in the U.S. pay includes twenty- five dollars for the annual subscription.

Within the next couple of months, there will a link on the IYNAUS store page where people can subscribe directly. (However, one can subscribe by just sending the $25.00 to IYNAUS at 1952 First Avenue South, Suite 1B, Seattle, WA 98134, and noting that they wish to subscribe). The yoga community in India and the U.S. is pretty low tech, so unfortunately the renewal process isn’t automatic – at least not yet. People need to re-subscribe each year.

HOW IT GETS SENT OUT FROM INDIA: Representatives in many countries (mainly nominated by the Associations) collect the subscriptions on Yoga Rahasya’s behalf.   They then inform Yoga Rahasya in Pune and the issues are mailed out from India. Generally subscriptions are taken for a calendar year. For example, even if one were to subscribe in July they still receive all the four issues for that year. Each country has its own policy for collecting the payment from the subscribers.

Single copies may be purchased through the various associations world- wide. IYNAUS purchases a few copies of every issue and directly sells them. Also, there are back issues available for purchase from The Store (link on IYNAUS website)

COMPILATIONS:  There are 5 sets of compilations: YR -A from 1994 to 1996, YR – B from 1997 to 1998, YR –C  from1999 to 2000 and YR – D  from 2001 to 2002 as well as YR – THERAPY. These are available through IYNAUS and of course at RIMYI, Pune or at Iyengar Yogashraya, Mumbai. Single copies of issues published after 2003 are for sale provided they are in stock. The ‘representatives’ from the various associations around the worlds are periodically informed about the stock status of the back issue before they collect any payment for them.

© 2011 Bobby Clennell.