Posts Tagged ‘Adho Mukha Virasana’

Colombia: September 16 – 18

February 8, 2017

Workshop at Natural Yoga, Bogotá.

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When the ankles are a problem in Virasana and Supta Virasana, kneel on a blanket stack, with the toes trailing off the back edge.

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It’s a wonderful thing when you get up into Full Arm Balance (Adho Mukha Vriksasana) for the first time. The next thing she has to learn: lift the inner ankles, the inner edges of the feet and the big toe mounds.

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Prasarita Padottanasana (shown here with the head up). Working with a belt will help you to roll and then press the outer edges of the feet down, hit the inner knees away from each other and pull the inner thighs up into the inner groins, and back. Once learned, dispense with the belt.

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© 2017 Bobby Clennell.

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Monterrey, Mexico

February 3, 2016

Workshop at Centro de Yoga Luz.

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Adho Mukha Virasana. Place the lower forearms on blocks to provide space for the breast tissue to ” breathe” and shoulder joints to open.

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Sirsasana. Time to get off the wall!

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Dwi Pada Viparita Dandasana over Crossed Bolsters. This student experienced low back pain which was threatening to interfere with her staying power. A horizontal bolster was placed under her feet. Instant relief!

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Do Bharadvajasana at the wall for great leverage. Now you can lift and turn more.

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…and the same for Marichyasana 1.

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My long and flexible spine says I need a higher support in this pose. Now my diaphragm can open, which means my lungs are working more efficiently.

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Place the hips at the wall – the sit bones should be dropped back off the edge of the support – and make sure the top of your shoulders are rolled under – opening the chest.

Monterrey

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On my last night in Monterrey, on La Guadalupana Day (Our Lady of Guadalupe Day), we took the Santa Lucia boat tour on the recently built canal.

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While I ate my tostadas, my hosts munched on deep fried chilies. One of my hosts in Merida lined up his raw chilies along side of his dinner plate.

© 2016 Bobby Clennell.

Kids practice

January 22, 2016

It all starts by joining in with mom or dad.

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Adho Mukha Svanasana — This is Tal Messica’s two-year-old daughter, Malaya, who spends a lot of time in the yoga studio with her parents, imitating, in her own creative way, the poses she sees. Tal teaches at and owns the Iyengar Yoga Center of Ojai, California.

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Paschima Namaskarasana in Vajrasana.

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Adho Mukha Virasana.

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Urdhva Mukha Svanasana, Adho Mukha Svanasana. Good job Malaya!

 

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Supta Virasana — a mother/daughter team.

And soon they are teaching others.

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Adho Mukha Svanasana.

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Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana — Photo by Suzie Dodd of her daughter Fern. “We call it Bobby Clennell Pose”.

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After a long day’s practice…

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… it’s nice to kick back and relax.

Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in. I try my best to correctly credit all the photos, but if I’ve fogotten your child’s name, please send it to me, and I’ll update the post.

© 2016 Bobby Clennell.

Merida, Mexico

January 2, 2016

Workshop at Namasté Yoga.

This student came into class with a migraine.

While the rest of the class followed the workshop program…

….she practiced a series of seated forward bends: Adho Mukha Virasana, Adho Mukha Sukhasana, and Janu Sirsasana with long holdings. These three simple forward bends (start with the head supported on a level with the chest) are very effective when dealing with migraine headaches.

In the menopause workshop, we practiced Cross Ropes Adho Mukha Svanasana, placing the crown of the head on a support to keep the brain quiet and cool.

Uttitha Trickonasana facing the wall. Sciatic pain is very common during menopause as the groins can become hard and the abdominal muscles tense at this stage. To avoid sciatica, open the front leg pelvis toward the wall and roll the pubic bone up. Facing the wall provides support so that the pelvic organs can be brought into alignment — this is also helpful for those with fibroids, ovarian cysts or endometrial scar tissue.

Uttitha Trickonasana, with back to wall. This variation provides support from behind, so less energy is expended and less heat generated (such as hot flashes or the heat generated during menstruation). Brings life to the spine and hip joints. Facing out is helpful for women when menopause is over to avoid osteoporosis of the spine, shoulders and hip joints. Open the back leg hip and chest toward the wall.

Set up for Sarvangasana with three or (or four for a greater lift) blankets.

Sarvangasana. Come first to Halasana. To avoid collapsing at the base, clip the outer edges of the shoulder-blades in.

Press the outer, upper arms to the floor and lift the cervical spine away from the floor.

Sarvangasana: align the side body along the midline.

My host, Beatrize, with a student in Baddha Konasana in Hanging Sirsasana.

Merida

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Pretty doors.

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Weddings say so much about the culture of a place. The reception was held at the family ranch.

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Grand living in Merida.

© 2015 Bobby Clennell.

new kids love yoga blog

December 19, 2015

Kids getting inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga.

We're excited!

Amber and Webber from Taipei, Taiwan. We’re excited!

Let's get started.

Let’s get started.

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Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog Pose).

Roar like a lion.

Roar like a lion!! Simhasana (Lion Pose).

Let's be turtles…

Let’s be tortioses…

…and pull our heads into our shells.

…and pull our heads into our shells -Kurmasana.

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Cool down in Adho Mukha Virasana (Child’s Pose).

Time to relax…

Savasana: Time to relax…

…like Teddy!

…like Teddy!

 

And here’s the advanced class using The Woman’s Yoga Book as a reference.

“Ivan decided he had practiced yoga for kids quite enough and turned his curious mind to Bobby Clennell’s brilliant The Woman’s Yoga Book”, says his Mother Julia Zabrodina from St. Petersburg, Russia.

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Parsva Swastikasana…

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….with Head On A Chair.

Thanks to everyone who has sent me photos of their kids who were inspired by my book, Watch Me Do Yoga; please keep sending them in. I try my best to correctly credit all the photos, but if I’ve fogotten your child’s name, please send it to me, and I’ll update the post.

February 2014, Pune.

March 10, 2014

The Institute.

At the RIMYI we have three classes with Geeta Iyengar per week: two women’s classes (one of which if there is room, the men may attend) and a pranayama class. Prashant Iyengar teaches at 7am, four mornings a week. If you want to experience B.K.S. Iyengar in action you had better get yourself along to the medical classes in the afternoons. In addition, there are six open practice sessions per week where Guruji practices along with local and visiting students, most of them teachers. He invariably interrupts his own practice to instruct someone else and oftentimes this someone is his grand daughter, Abhijata. We gather round to watch, listen and absorb. Then when Guruji returns to his own practice, we drift back to our mats and our own practice.

Prashant Iyengar.

“Rivers of breath” pranayama class.
Just as rivers nourish the land, Prashant says, the breath also provides us with nourishment. These days people flock to the cities to live, but there was a time when people settled along rivers. He talked about how the Amazon flows fresh into the ocean for miles and miles, providing sustenance for all who live along its banks. Similarly, when we practice pranayama, we become energized, re-vitalized, invigorated.

Geeta Iyengar. Wednesday February 19: excerpts from Geeta’s second back bend class.

Adho Mukha Virasana
Adho Mukha Svanasana
Sirsasana:

  • Be independent. If you lean against the wall, you will never learn.
  • For those who practiced rope Sirsasana; it’s a horizontal pose as well as a vertical pose. Even in Rope Sirsasana, place your palms on the floor the width of the shoulders to create that space. Don’t just hang – lift your shoulders up away from the floor and widen the collar bones.
  • Always move the front of the leg toward the back of the leg.
  • Forehead quiet, but the body should be very much active. Raise the whole body up from the inside.

(Many, many) Urdhva Dhanurasana’s into Viparita Dandasana: Men usually sit at the back, but today Geeta asked them to move to the front of the class. Geeta talked about some of the differences between men and women. Women are more supple then men. In these back bends, they can easily open the front ribs and lift the chest, but they tend to drop the buttocks and pelvis, which strains the lumbar. In addition, they tend to get tired. Men are strong, so they can hold themselves up more easily; but they push hard into the chest and don’t get the natural lift that women get. Some of us, myself included, had a wall to hold the elbows against and a workable mat (from the donated mats in the prop room), which held my feet well, enabling me to access my back muscles and raise my spine.

8-5“Lie on your back, with your head toward the platform.  With feet apart, walk your feet in and hold ankles. Bend your arms. Place your hands on the floor, close to your shoulders. Distribute the weight evenly between the palms. Broaden the palms. Push up into Urdhva Dhanurasana. Walk in with your palms. Raise the chest to walk the palms toward the feet.”

  • Open the armpit chest. Walk in with the feet and be on the arm side. Lift the side trunk!
  • Raise the heels and tailbone up; walk the feet in.

MEN

  • Men always take the knees out – roll them!
  • Shinbones are short, they should be long – knee to shin, elongation.
  • Navel should be up.
  • Suck the elbows straight – die at the elbows! Tighten the elbows! We strapped the elbows – yes, it really has to break into pieces! Have the belt close to the elbow joint.
  • The lightness has to come – lock in the elbow joint. All the men have a belt on the elbow.
  • The flexibility can be seen in Guruji’s photo from Light On Yoga, but the stability is not seen.
  • Pump the body close to the platform.

Viparita Dandasana

  • Push the back ribs forward. At first, keep your head up. Open chest with the head up. Then place head to floor, but keep the chest tall.
  • Men: in back bends, you don’t open your chest.
  • Women; your buttocks drop.

Savasana – stretch your legs out.
Adho Mukha Svanasana, hands to wall.
Sarvangasana
Either Halasana or Karnapidasana (depending on space available)
Pachimottanasana
Savasana

Acknowledgments:
Thank you Julia Pederson who observed the class and took notes, and
Richard Jonas who contributed to these notes from his memory of the class.

Guruji, Wednesday February 20: morning practice.

Guruji spoke of citta chidra or ‘perforated mind’ meaning fissured consciousness. Abhijata, his granddaughter called it ‘leaky consciousness’ as in  “Something slips out; the awareness does not hold itself inside.”

For we students, says Guruji, the mind goes to pleasure; “I like this, I don’t enjoy that, I enjoy this!” In that state, we work from the brain, of which the mind is but a part. When you work from the brain, you sweat in the face, you remain locked in the head, your consciousness does not penetrate the body.

Guruji explains we have to ‘expand from the center to open the four lobes of the brain.’

Guruji showed us the sole of his foot. He expands the arch so that the skin across it is sharp, not dull and not sinking. When one works like that, one does not sweat, one is not stuck in the brain; awareness permeates the areas of the body to which it is directed.
Verse II. 47: ananta samapattibhyam. The balanced state of awareness (samapatti) is endless (ananta).

For us, sadly, it is antara (different, other, outside) samapattibhyam.

The mind goes out, looking for pleasure. It is ‘antara’, different, other. Then, of course, it fluctuates and moves around.

We have to learn ananta (endless) samapattih, a balanced state of consciousness.

Yoga is a spiritual practice. Ananta – or endlessness – is a spiritual state.

When instead, you practice Antara – other, different – you are jumping from one thing to the next. “I like it, I don’t like it. Where is the discipline? There is none.”

One has to go beyond that kind if mind, beyond, ‘leaky consciousness.’

Ananata – endlessness – comes from discipline.

Read about chitta cidra on page 57 of The Core of the Yoga Sutras, B.K.S Iyengar’s most recent book. Those who want to look will see what he says on that page in the light of his little talk during the open practice at RIMYI that morning.

Acknowledgments:
Thank you Zoe Stewart who relayed Guruji’s discourse from the morning open practice.
Many thanks also to Richard Jonas for his sensitive editing.

Kids Love Yoga…and so do pets!

January 23, 2014
Serafina won't even let this go at the Magritte exhibit!

Serafina Raggaza Sciorra won’t even let this go at the Magritte exhibit!

She really wanted to do fish pose but the garden was closed. She vowed to return…

She really wanted to do fish pose but the garden was closed. She vowed to return…

Serafina teaching her sister Katyana and brother Enrico.

Later, at home, Serafina teaching her sister Katyana and brother Enrico.

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On Christmas morning, 2 year old Grayleigh Smith from Boston unwrapped her gift, Watch Me Do Yoga, and immediately started her yoga practice. This is Adho Mukha Virasana (Downward Facing Hero Pose).

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Candice, preparing for Parsvottanasana (Extended Side-Stretch Pose), at the Parent & Kid Yoga class, the Iyengar Yoga Institute of China, Guangzhou.

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Careful placement of feet as a preparation for Utthita Trikonasana (Extended Triangle Pose).

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Anna Uribe’s little boy, Martin (at Natural Yoga in Bogota, Columbia) preparing for Virabhadrasana I (Warrior Pose I).

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Seven-month-old Olivia, in Brisbane, Australia, practices an impromtu Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward Facing Dog Pose). She’s the granddaughter of Narelle Carter–Quinlan, a certified Iyengar Yoga teacher. Narelle, an anatomist by accademic training, specializes in yoga for scoliosis.

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“Come on! The props are out — let’s practice!” Photo of Cecil, her cat and Peaches her dog © by Judi Lanszberg Friedman.

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Judi Landzberg Friedman and her dog Peaches from Bedford Corners, New York, practicing Parsva Upavistha Konasana (Seated Wide-Angle Sidebend Pose).

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Jarvis Chen and a dog called Boo practicing Viparita Dandasana (Inverted Staff Pose). Jarvis is practicing a supported variation. Boo’s pose is combined with a slight twist and is independent of props.