Archive for January, 2015

Guangzhou. November 20 – 23. 2014.

January 26, 2015

Free Breast Health class at The Iyengar Yoga Institute, Guangzhou, China.

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Around 90 women showed up for this class.

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They don’t use the term “breast cancer” here.

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The closest I could get to a translation was “breast displaisure”. But whatever term you use, it’s in the increase in China. There seem to be less mammograms here. Many of the women who showed up to this class said they had recieved ultrasounds.

Women’s Workshop

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Uttanasana. To minimise abdominal or armpit compression, keep your arms aligned with your torso as you fold forward into the pose.

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We imprinted the extension of the abdominal area as a way of dealing with, or avoiding abdominal scar tissue and ovarian cysts.

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For an excessive menstrual flow (more likely experienced by women going through menopause), take the support of the bench.

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This student found relief for her heavy menstrual flow in this pose.

Baddha Konasana. Sitting with the rope around the mid back trains the back muscles and the spine to play a supporting roll.

 

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This pose helps reduce menstrual pain caused by endometriosis (a well known condition in China).

 

© 2015 Bobby Clennell.

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Hangzhou

January 19, 2015

Out and about in Hangzhou.

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Watching a mahjong game.

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Hot fruit tea. There is no such thing as cold jiuce – or even cold water – in China.

Workshop

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Pincha Myorasana (Elbow Balance) is all about musclular alignment, as opposed to Vrksasana (Full Arm Balance), which has more to do with skeletal alignment. Pull the triceps onto the upper arm bone, and slide it up onto the deltoid. ‘Fix’ the deltoid muscle up onto the shoulder blade. Hold those muscles firm and you have your balance.

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In order to keep the pelvic organs healthy, learn how to avoid compression and  maintain extension throughout the front of the pelvic area.

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Elongating the abdomen before twisting in Parsva Swastikasana.

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Practice the “L” shaped poses to create space thoughout the pelvic organs. This pose, in combination with other poses, helps reduce excessivly heavy menstryal bleeding.

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Sarvangasana. Start in Halasana. Press the outer edges of the feet into the sides of the chair, as if you were trying to break the chair apart. Absorb your spine into your back. Open up the backs of the knees to the ceiling.

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This prop, which is two covered foams, zippered together, are unique to China. Press the outer edges of the shoulder blades foreward into the chest.

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Sarvangasana. Role the outer, upper arms down. Don’t let the weight of the back ribs drop onto the hands. The hands should press into the back ribs.

© 2015 Bobby Clennell.

Beijing. November 8, 9 and 10. 2014.

January 10, 2015

The Summer Palace, Beijing.

I could definitely spend my Julys and Augusts here!

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Workshop at FineYoga.

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My translator, Ming, supported me every inch of the way!

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A variation of Parighasana (Gate Pose).

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Maintain the bent leg hip directly above the knee. The upper arm shoulder blade should feel sharp: pull it away from the upper-arm itself, and down away from the neck. Press the front (straight) leg buttock forward. Revolve the torso and pelvis away from the front leg.

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Everyone got up into Adho Mukha Vrksasana, one way or the other.

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This was a Side Stretch class, so, more Parighasana….Pull the right thigh bone deep into the hip socket. Extend both sides of the torso toward the window.

 

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Unwinding with Parsva Uttanasana. First to the left,

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and then to the right. Keep that left hip pinned well back. Move the left ear toward the outer right shinbone. I like the way this student used the chair.

© 2015 Bobby Clennell.

 

Bogotá, Colombia. 17, 18 and 19th of October, 2014

January 5, 2015

Workshop

Two of the themes running through my Workshop at Natural Yoga (yoga para todos en Bogotá): Elements and Koshas, and Breast Care for Everyone:

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Here are some simple depictions of the subtle channels known as the nadis through which the life force (prana) circulates. On the left, the ida, pingala and the shushumna are considered the most important. On the right, the entire network of nadis extend way beyond the confines of the physical body. You can see the sun and the moon, which have their counterparts within each embodiment. You can also see the chakras.

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Each portion of the sound form “Om” links to an element, a subtle element (experienced by the senses), and a vayu (vital air).

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We explored a practice which promoted lymphatic drainage around the arm-pits

and breasts;

strengthened the immune system,

supported liver function,

and promoted ease and freedom in the chest,

upper back and lungs,

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and shoulders.

The Botero Museum

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Though he only spends one month of the year in Columbia,

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Botero considers himself the “most Colombian artist living” due to his insulation from the international trends of the art world.

The Gold Museum

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The Bogota Gold Museum contains close to 34,000 gold pieces, plus 20,000 bone, stone, ceramic, and textile articles belonging to 13 Pre-Hispanic societies.

Dealing emeralds on the street

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Only $30 a piece we were told!

 

© 2015 Bobby Clennell.